North Carolina Students Receive Free CAD Computers

For students who grow up in economically disadvantaged areas of the country, it can be hard to get access to the latest and best technology and resources. When those students are interested in fields such as architecture and engineering, where tools such as computer aided design software are essential both to learning and completing projects, the lack of resources can be even more damaging. Thanks to the efforts of North Carolina’s Project Bauhow, however, several aspiring architects and designers no longer have to worry about lack of access to the CAD tools they need, as they have been given free CAD computers with which they can work on their design projects from home.

Jacksonville High was one of ten schools that qualified for the CAD computer donations, which were determined by the level of interest and the economic neediness of the areas where the schools were located. A total of 20 students will receive the computers, which are installed with brand new 2016 edition CAD software (Jacksonville High’s computers only have the 2014 edition).[i]

Project Bauhow, the initiative that provided the computers, helps support architecture and design education for ninth and tenth graders in North Carolina. The group notes that while high school design classes are important, they do not provide students with enough time to fully learn the skills or build the portfolios required to apply for college admission, and that 60% of the state’s families do not have the economic means to afford a CAD computer. As such, Project Bauhow does what it can to provide disadvantaged students, especially those in rural areas, with tools that can help them gain the necessary proficiency in design and drafting.

Supporting Modernist Architecture

Project Bauhow is a part of North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH), an educational nonprofit archive that focuses on documenting North Carolina’s legacy of Modernist residential architecture (North Carolina has the third largest collection of Modernist houses of any state in the U.S.), as well as promoting the building of new Modernist houses through education and advocacy initiatives. The Kramden Institute, an organization that refurbishes old computers and donates them to needy students, also provides support for Project Bauhow.[ii]

In addition to providing them with computers, Project Bauhow also provides students with additional instruction, and gives them a chance to test their knowledge by competing in a design competition. In return for receiving the computers, schools agree to give all design class students an assignment for which they design a Modernist house, which will then be submitted to an NCMH design competition. All entries will be considered for the student category of the NCMH Matsumoto Prize, where they will be evaluated by residential architects. A winner is selected from each school that received a Bauhow computer, and each winner is awarded with a scholarship to the North Carolina State University Design Day Camp, which has taught more than 3,300 students in fields such as architecture, industrial design, and graphic design.

We here at Q-CAD congratulate all the Project Bauhow recipients and wish them luck in their future careers.

For more information on Q-CAD and CAD architectural drafting, call us today at 800-700-3305.




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